Category Archives: curriculum

Small Class Sizes at Square Roots Preschool

Our small class-size is just one of the many reasons to choose Square Roots for your preschooler. Did you know that a typical preschool classroom has sixty conflicts per hour, according to an article we found on Conscious Discipline. That’s one per minute! The main reason for this is larger class sizes of same-aged children who have the same needs and skills.

square roots classroom   Small Class size classroom1

Here are some of the other reasons we think you should choose Square Roots Preschool…

Our curriculum identifies goals in all areas of development:
Social: to help children feel comfortable in school, trust their new environment, make friends, and feel that they are part of the group.
Emotional: to help children experience pride and self-confidence, develop independence and self-control, and have a positive attitude toward life.
Cognitive: to help children become confident learners by letting them try out their own ideas and experience success, and by helping them acquire learning skills such as the ability to solve problems, make decisions, ask questions, and use words to describe their ideas, observations, and feelings.
Physical: to help children increase their large and small muscle skills and feel confident about what their bodies can do.

Global Awareness and Creative Expression Combined

For Earth Day at Square Roots, we talked about global awareness.  The children were each given a coffee filter to create an earth using markers and water bottles. This gave them the opportunity for creative expression and worked on fine motor skills with spraying the water bottles.

Earth day activity earth day pic earth pic

We are enrolling new preschoolers for the fall. Call us today for more info and to schedule a tour 480-447-7668.

Why Choose Square Roots Preschool?

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Our curriculum identifies goals in all areas of development:
Social: to help children feel comfortable in school, trust their new environment, make friends, and feel that they are part of the group.
Emotional: to help children experience pride and self-confidence, develop independence and self-control, and have a positive attitude toward life.
Cognitive: to help children become confident learners by letting them try out their own ideas and experience success, and by helping them acquire learning skills such as the ability to solve problems, make decisions, ask questions, and use words to describe their ideas, observations, and feelings.
Physical: to help children increase their large and small muscle skills and feel confident about what their bodies can do.

Classroom Conflicts and the Benefits of Smaller Class Size

Conscious Discipline cites that a typical preschool classroom has sixty conflicts per hour. That’s one per minute! The main reason for this is larger class sizes of same-aged children who have the same needs and skills. This is a recent problem that is on the rise. When young children are in classrooms filled with conflict, there is less learning time, their social skills are hindered, and the environment can create lasting behavior problems.

In the past, young children were typically taught in multi-age groups, and conflicts were fewer. Students of different ages offered different skill sets to contribute to the group and had different needs, so there was not as much competition.

At Square Roots Preschool, our class sizes are much smaller than an average preschool. Our classes have five students maximum. Those classes have students ranging in age from 2-5. The teacher has time to attend to the needs of individual students, and there is more instruction time since conflicts are fewer. In our classes, we practice conscious discipline in order to help our students resolve conflict. We help them communicate how they want to be treated by asking them questions about the situation with the goal that they will learn to manage conflict situations on their own in a respectful manner. We help by suggesting words that they can use and talk about how we can handle a conflict situation better in the future. We practice our skills and learn to treat one another with respect.

The Conscious Discipline video, “Are Children Safe in Preschool?,” illustrates the importance of empowering children to be socially successful as well as develop cognitively during their preschool years.

Learning About the Letter “H”

At Square Roots Preschool, we believe in tackling a concept from a variety of angles. When this approach is used, the concept becomes more concrete in the mind of a preschooler.

We typically focus on studying one letter each week, and we try to make the theme of most of our activities that week about that letter. This past week, we studied the letter “H.” It is our goal that the students can recognize the letter and it’s sound, as well as identify words and objects that begin with the letter of focus. All children are given the opportunity to write the letter, as well. Some of the activities we worked on this week are described, below.

1. “H Hearts.” The students were given a traced outline of the capital H and were asked to decorate the outline with heart stickers. They can focus on the letter and the sound, as well as identify an object (heart) that begins with that letter. In peeling each sticker, they have the opportunity to work on their small motor skills. Preschoolers love decorating with stickers, so this activity was fun for our students.

2. “Writing the Letter H.” During circle time, our students have the opportunity to write our letter of focus on their white boards. The older students can typically write the letter independently, while the younger students may need a bit of assistance or may opt to draw a picture of something that begins with the letter we are working on. We couple this activity with working as a team to create a long list of things that begin with the letter “H.”

3. “Hula Hoop Fun.” During outdoor exploration time, we brought out the hula hoops! The sound of the letter “H” is reinforced in this activity, and the students had a chance to work on gross motor skills while burning off some energy. They had the opportunity to use the hula hoop in the traditional way or jump in and out of a circle on the ground, depending on their physical development.

4. “Hurricanes.” Our science study was all about hurricanes. We discussed hurricanes, watched a video about hurricanes, and got to create our own hurricanes. While reinforcing our letter of focus, we got to learn about something new, work on our pre-writing and writing skills, and work on our gluing skills. The students made predictions and learned about cause and effect.

LetterH

These four activities are just a sample of the letter learning we did this week. By incorporating a variety of skills, subjects, and concepts centered around a single letter, we are able to reinforce letter recognition and letter sounds which are vital to reading and writing. The students are able to work as a team and individually in all sorts of ways, ensuring that we touch on each student’s learning style. In doing so, we build confidence and work on skills that need further development, all while having fun!